The many roles of an Instructor

Often we are motivated by articles we are sent by our friends and family. Sometimes they ring true, sometimes they just sound good. Try this one out for size, it was sent to me by a Black Belt.

What do you get when you join the ACTION TKD martial arts school?
Being taught to kick and punch, right?

What benefits are we really receiving from our Instructors and the ACTION TKD school?

  1. A life coach
  2. A psychologist
  3. A mentor
  4. An inspirer
  5. A supporter
  6. A friend
  7. A problem solver
  8. A stress reliever
  9. Being encouraged to believe in yourself
  10. A personal trainer
  11. A dietician
  12. A Strength, flexibility and weight loss coach
  13. Being taught personal victory
  14. Someone to call on 24/7
  15. Someone who encourages you and your children to have respect, patience, humility, discipline, perseverance, empathy, listening skills, loyalty and self control
  16. Being taught to work hard and play hard
  17. Someone who holds you accountable for your actions
  18. Being encouraged to set goals and reach them
  19. Someone who helps you build mental and emotional strength
  20. Someone who reminds you of your worth and who will stand by you
  21. Someone who teaches you to stand up to bullies
  22. Someone who sacrifices everything to teach you everything they know

Still think you’re just being taught to kick and punch here at ACTION TKD? Keep thinking.

Speed is very important for powerful techniques

You probably know that speed is very important for powerful techniques. A small increase in speed leads to a surprisingly large increase in power. Last night we did an experiment to see how fast a side kick needs to be to break an unsupported board using slow motion video. Usually a board breaks partly because of the resistance of the holders, so if there’s no holder you need to kick much faster.

Your foot needs to travel from the ground to the ready position for your side kick (knee bent and pulled up, foot pulled across), then out to a locked position. For an 80kg person kicking, to break an unsupported board this all needs to take place in approximately three tenths of a second!

To improve your speed, you need to stretch more and improve your flexibility. You also need to practice your technique so that you can instinctively deliver the technique perfectly in such a short timeframe.

Remember that all your instructors were white belts once! Keep coming to training and you’ll be able to pull off impressive techniques like this as well.

Practice everything!

There’s always the temptation when practising a martial art to just practice with the students and techniques you know. Sometimes we can get caught up in practising our technique and form so much that we forget what our art is designed for. Last night at Moreland was an awesome session where we went through how some of your basic techniques can be used in self defence, as well as some more advanced techniques from patterns. Remember that although good technique is hugely important, it’s no good unless you know when and how to apply it.

Keep practising so that your techniques are as well-executed as possible, and if you don’t know what a technique is used for ask your Instructor!

The post Practice everything! appeared first on Action Tae Kwon Do – Melbourne.


Source: ACTIONTKD Melbourne

Front Snap Kick

The front snap kick will be one of the very first techniques you learn in Tae Kwon-Do and will be one you practice and improve constantly throughout your training. It is delivered with the ball of the foot, pushing explosively into a target. The correct position is with the foot pointed and the toes pulled back so that the ball of the foot contacts the target. In this way, all of the force is concentrated into a smaller area.

On your front snap kick, make sure that you pull your knee up in front so that you can explode outwards and push directly into a target. A common mistake, especially when first learning this technique, is to kick in such a way that your foot travels out and up in an arc, rather than directly into a target – most of the force is going upwards, rather than into the target. Trying this out a couple of times on a kicking bag will quickly show you why kicking upwards has less of an effect than kicking in – you will glance off the bag instead of delivering a strong kick.

Having a strong and fast front snap kick is incredibly useful both in and out of the gym. It can be used in a self defence situation if somebody is approaching you – drop away, then kick hard towards the solar plexus, ribs, knee or groin. In the gym, it will be one of your most frequently used techniques in sparring.

To improve your kick, do plenty of squats to improve your leg strength and practice pointing your foot so that you strike with the ball of the foot.

The post Front Snap Kick appeared first on Action Tae Kwon Do – Melbourne.


Source: ACTIONTKD Melbourne